Bryan J. Rieker, D.D.S.
303.452.9200

Services

Rieker Smiles’ comprehensive dentistry practice allows you to maintain and treat the full oral health and hygiene of your teeth, gums and jaw. By serving the majority of your dental needs within one practice for all ages, we are able to detect and address problems early, while minimizing the requirement to see outside specialists. We emphasize total preventive care for our patients by providing high-quality services for oral health maintenance, while also restoring health impacted by disease, injury, and common problems that require cosmetic dentistry. We stay abreast of advanced treatment technologies, utilizing the most effective measures serve your dental health.

First Dental Visit
A child’s first dental visit should be scheduled around his/ her first birthday. The most important part of the visit is getting to know and becoming comfortable with a doctor and his staff. A pleasant, comfortable first visit builds trust and helps put the child at ease during future dental visits. Children should be encouraged to discuss any fears or anxiety they feel.

 

 

 

 

Children’s Dental Health
Innumerable studies and research have concluded the importance of starting children early with good dental hygiene and oral care. According to research, tooth decay affects 50 percent of first-graders and 80 percent of 17-year-olds. Early treatment prevents problems affecting a child’s health, well-being, self-image and overall achievement.

Parents must introduce proper oral care early in a child’s life – as early as infancy. The American Dental Hygiene Association states that a good oral hygiene routine for children includes:
  • Thoroughly cleaning your infant’s gums after each feeding with a water-soaked infant cloth. This stimulates the gum tissue and removes food.
  • Gently brushing your baby’s erupted teeth with a small, soft-bristled toothbrush and using a pea-sized amount of fluoridated toothpaste.
  • Teaching your child at age 2 or 3 about proper brushing techniques and later teaching them brushing and gentle flossing.
  • Regular visits with their dentist to check for cavities in the primary teeth and for possible developmental problems.
  • Encouraging your child to discuss any fears they may have about oral health visits, but not mentioning words like “pain” or “hurt,” since this may instill the possibility of pain in the child’s thought process.
  • Determining if the water supply that serves your home is fluoridated; if not, discussing supplement options with your dentist or hygienist.
  • Asking your hygienist or dentist about sealant applications to protect your child’s teeth-chewing surfaces and about bottle tooth decay, which occurs when teeth are frequently exposed to sugared liquids.
Infant Dental Care
Primary teeth are vital to development of the jaws and for guiding the permanent (secondary) teeth into place when they replace the primary teeth around age 6. Since primary teeth guide the permanent teeth into place, infants with missing primary teeth or infants who prematurely lose primary teeth may require a space maintainer, a device used to hold the natural space open. Without a maintainer, the teeth can tilt toward the empty space and cause permanent teeth to come in crooked. The way your child cares for his/her primary teeth plays a critical role in how he/she treats the permanent teeth.